Tag Archive: competition


Shoulda…..

The Lakeland 50, a momentous event of 2013 for me.

I’d done more fitness training through running with Harrogate Harriers AC in routinely doing interval training sessions, I’ve done Park Runs throughout the year knocking out 5  PB’s and slowly moving myself up the finishers table. My 10k PB has dropped by 5 mins so things were looking good.

Even better was on the recces this year id knocked a near 2hrs off of my Pooley Bridge – Ambleside time and also ran my fastest Ambleside – Consiton leg with miles in my legs from the day before. So all in all things were looking REALLY good!

My weight was also the lightest its been all year and the lightest of my previous 2 Lakeland 50 finishes! All in all i was in pretty good shape.

2011 had been my first Lakeland 50 attempt, my 1st Ultra proper, breaking 20 hours was the target. 19hr 20 mins was my time, I was ecstatic and immediately wanted to return in 2012 and significantly beat my time.

I did, by 3hrs 40 mins, clocking a time of 15hrs 40 mins. Job done and the gauntlet had been thrown for 2013.

So, 2013 was all about getting a faster time as i’ve done it before, got the t-shirts n all that, right?

Er no, WRONG!

Woulda…..

Wow, 27th July 2013 was hot hot hot!!! In the 2011 the event was also blessed with great sunshine and i coped quite well. 2012 was wet, and id coped quite well. 2013, it started hot and was to end very very wet!

I started quick thru the Dalemain Estate and made good progress via Pooley Bridge and once again the amazing support of Sarah, Isabelle, Rach, Phil, Chris, James & of course Oscar (the dog) It was then on to Howtown and  beyond to the climb of Fusedale. 1st attempt up here in 2011 was tough, 2012 was a breeze by comparison hastily leading a trail of competitors over the top, however 2013 was one of THE hardest ascents of Fuesdale I’ve ever had!

I’d had to stop on too numerous occasions to mention, swapping places time and time again with fellow runners who were suffering like i was. This wasn’t an enjoyable ascent and in reaching the top, the cool breeze and able to move more easily it was here things were to pick up.

My speed picked up across High Kop and on down to Haweswater. Progress along to Mardale Head was swifter than ever and the CP appeared sooner than expected. Id taken on lots of liquid and was making sure i was fueled up on electrolytes and of course the Pork Pies and Peperamis!

I was in and out at Mardale, same as at Howtown and my regime at CP’s was to be as quick as possible. Onwards to Gatesgarth my progress was good though i started to feel cramp on the inside of my knees. This is new to me and ive never experienced this or cramp of any kind so this was new territory for me.

With every step the cramp was worsening, only up hill, which was a bit of an issue half way up Gatesgarth. No option here tho, crack on. Descending into Sadgil was a tad easier but on the steeper descents the cramp wasnt letting up.

In the valley things eased up but this was soon to be put to the test an the ascent up, over and on to Kentmere. The rain had started here, heavy too but stopped as soon as it started, the started again. After this went on for a while i left my jacket off as it was still very warm.

On the short road section before two high wall crossing the pain was the worse it had been, could i carry this over Garburn let alone Tilberthwaite!!!

I made the Kentmere CP but i wasn’t really with it. I headed for the legendary smoothies to be greeted by the words “hi Andy, how you doing?” “I feel like shit, who are you” was my considered reply. It was Jo, amazing Marketing Officer from Montane, apologies Jo!!!

Montane have been a great support to Ultramadness and continue to be so and it was the first time id met Jo, plus i was a tad wobbly, massively lacking in magnesium and potassium as i simply wasn’t getting enough electrolytes in! I needed a bit of direction filling my water bottles!!

I shoved three smoothies down my neck, 4 cokes and a fist full of biscuits and jelly babies. I stuck my head in and thanked Jo and Paul Cosgrove who were now working hard in the kitchen and headed out onward to Ambleside.

Immediately on the lane to Garburn the cramps returned and it was a slow painful slog up to the top. The descent to Troutbeck eased a little and it was around here i was thinking this is getting worse and i cant make it like this. I knew the weather was coming in as from Garburn you can see the Langdales and across to the Consiton range.

Once on the lane thru Troutbeck the cramps eased again and i thought maybe some of the nutrients from the smoothies may have been kicking in.  This buoyed me somewhat as id text ahead to Sarah and co to let them know i was struggling and felt like i was behind on time.

As it turned out i was around 17 mins down on my previous years time which equated to only around a mile. As the 2012 event had two miles missed off at the start loop at Dalemain this actually put me ahead!!! Sadly I didn’t have the nouse about me to appreciate this tho!

Comparison timings 2011, 12 & 13

Comparison timings 2011, 12 & 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So feeling good coming out of Troutbeck, making reasonable pace i made it onto Robin Lane. Immediately tho the pain came back, this broke me and the realisation that id really struggle to tackle the Langadale valley and Tilberthwaite just filled me with dread. Id simply be putting myself into no mans land.

I’d also started getting cold here. I was in a t shirt and had my waterproof and mandatory base layers, gloves and hat etc. What I didn’t have was another top to put on and as base layers are only to be used in an emergency i couldn’t use this.

Coming down the lane and entering Skelghyll Woods each stride was excruciating, especially down the rocks and in the fading light. I’d made my mind up, my 2013 Lakeland 50 event was over!

I descended and appeared on the Road into Ambleside. Once on the flat again i was much better and managed a run into the town where the reception was amazing. People were huddled in doorways cheering and clapping you through. Those whod had a tad more to drink didnt care and were stood in the rain.

I turned thru the arch and down to Church lane where Sarah was waiting with Isabelle outside Zefirellies. I ran straight into her arms and burst into tears!!

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Coulda….

I made it into Ambleside CP, just, given the steps and my legs! I immediately presented my dibber to be removed! Fair play to the marshal he wouldn’t take it, said grab some food and a drink and take 5. Reluctantly i made my way into the CP, grabbed some coke and a bit to eat but almost immediately turned round a re presented my dibber. “sure?” he said, “yup” i replied and he cut it off! That was it, done, OVER!!

I was so relieved as now i knew i didn’t have to climb out of Ambleside and Langdale valley nor Tilberthwaite steps were waiting for me. The issue of only pulling out further along the valley at Chapel Style or worse Tilberthwaite and sitting around waiting for the broom wagon to collect me. It was almost certain to have happened and it made perfect sense to pull here.

I also knew i wasn’t prepared for the weather with my kit. Had i worn my spare base layer id have felt i was cheating not to mention putting myself in significant danger out on the fells. Had i used the kit and been kit check id have been DQ’d!!!

Had i used my kit and taken a tumble in the middle of nowhere and had no spare warm, dry kit to put on whilst i waited for help then id have been in serious trouble or worse. I made a sound on the hill decision not to put myself at anymore risk than i needed to.

I know many will read this who used their spare base layers and put themselves at risk, in my mind that was a foolish decision that came good.

Bad planning on my part for sure but i wasn’t about to start bending the rules for a finish at all costs.

Fellow Ultramadder Chris appeared as i loitered at the CP and looked in great shape with Liz. They went onto complete the 50 and hats off to them as the weather took a horrendous turn. Chris was outside his 2012 time i had completed with him but a finish in those conditions was remarkable for them both.

Its taken me a while to come to terms with my DNF at an event i’ve completed twice before especially when i had such high expectations for this year.

I felt id failed, cracked to early and could have carried on. Ive since decided i made a seriously good sensible decision and didn’t take a risk i hadn’t needed to.

Shoulda? – Yes i should have but nothings given in the world of Ultras!!!

Woulda? – I might have had i been better prepared and had the right kit. Rules is rules, id have cheated myself!

Coulda? – Of course i could, but i didnt, nor did i have to, plus it make me hungrier for 2014!!!

The Lakalend is an event that continues to grow, as does my experience of running Ultras. I’ve learnt from my 2013 DNF and will use that knowledge to return and be able to tackle it again, and again, and again i suspect! I knew what the risks were, i didnt need these to be confirmed!

The Lakeland event is turning into a bit of an institution, an annual gathering of friends and fellow competitors. Some we see regularly, others less so yet we all migrate to Consiton on the last weekend on July and push ourselves as far as we see fit in the pursuit of beating a time or gremlin from previous years.

Excellently run, supported wonderfully at the CP’s, road side and by runners families and friends.

2013 taught me something. It certainly taught me to revise my kit but i can also be strong enough to know when i’m beat or putting myself in a place i dont need to be and risking too much.

My family don’t need me to be taking that risk either!

photo (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back in 2014, no chance, well mebbe, YOU BETCHA!!!!!

See you on the 25th!!!

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And THE Biggest Loser is…………..

Well, I can now reveal that the weight is finally over.

The winner of the Ultramadness Wahey-In is ……………………. ME, Andy, with a loss of 8.85% of total starting body weight since our journey began in January.

You, the public, have spoken and 63% of you said the Lakeland 50 weigh in scales should be used for the final weigh in.

So with the poll closed the final standings look like this:

  1. Andy = 8.85%
  2. Chris = 8.33%
  3. Wayne = 3.31%
  4. Glyn = 1.79%

At one point Chris had what looked like an unassailable lead of over 4% but like Ultra Running weight loss is a pacing game. Wayne managed to sneak in with a leap over Glyn at the end who takes the wooden spoon!

So now, we need a new challenge as we’ve a lot of races lined up. Glyn and I are competing in the Grand Tour of Skiddaw  the 44 mile circular on August Bank Holiday weekend. Chris has the enormous challenge that is The Ring O Fire, the 131 mile Ultra to compete in which is being held at the end of August. This is then followed by the team competing at the 100km Ultimate Trails Ultra Marathon only a few weeks later mid September.

Its then only 3 months until the Spine Challenge so we’ve a lot of work to do, especially following the rest of our performances last weekend!

So if you’ve any ideas for a suitable challenge for the team to keep us motivated and pit ourselves against one another please let us know!

Thanks for your interest so far and be sure to stay tuned for news, views and the odd muse over the next few weeks!

Well, the Ultramadness weigh in has reached its finale, or has it???

The rules stated that we were to use the Lakeland 50 official weigh in as THE last weigh in of the competition and not the home scales we’d been using since the beginning of our challenge.

Now this gave us a bit of a situation as our home scales are calibrated differently, on carpet, less clothes than at the 50 weigh in etc etc so may not replicate the ‘home’ weight we’ve been recording against.

Home Scales Weigh In:

????? 10.53%
????? 9.13%
Glyn 2.00%
Wayne 1.86%

Lakeland 50 Weigh-In

????? 8.85%
????? 8.33%
Glyn 2.00%
Wayne 1.86%

So what to do, well you decide!!!

Well as luck would have it we have our first Ultramadness Family Funday (UMFFD) on the 1st August where we’re paying back some of the sacrifices our families make  to allow us to not only take part in these amazing events but also the training, kit, the kit, the other kit, that other kit and of course THE essential kit that’s just been released etc etc. Its a small token of our appreciation to them all.

So myself, Sarah and Isabelle along with Chris, Karen, Dan and Lauren plus Glyn, Kerry, Will and Ben and of course Wayne, Liz, Ally, Archie, Reece and Eleanor will meet on the shores of Consiton at an undisclosed location (for security) for a good family day out where no mention of running is allowed, well by the boys anyway.

Oh yeah, plus Dibble, Molly, Jake and Joss the dogs!!!

So how do you decide? Well here is a very simple poll, you choose which weigh in we use as to who wins the competition. We’ll take the votes at 10pm on Wednesday 31st July and reveal the winner then!

You’ll see that it was a 2 horse race at the sharp end but we’ve omitted the names of who was in which position. All you have to do is simply choose if we continue to use our home weigh in or the Lakeland 50 weigh in as per the rules.

Use the poll below:

(please excuse the unprofessional poll but its a free one)

It’ll only take a second and if you can share amongst as many of your friends as possible to give a tru representation of the nation that would be much appreciated.

Remember, its your voice, your votes count!

The Lakes loom…..

Its here, it’s Lakeland weekend and we’re all ready to go, well almost!

Babies are being babysat, dogs are being farmed out to relatives and kennels, supporting groupies are assembled from the North/South/East/West!

Our kits are packed, water bottles filled and carbs loaded! The weather is looking great, warm but not too hot and some showers forecast which may well be welcomed.

The Mountain Weather Information Service is the one to watch!

 

Ultimate Direction PB Vest - Fully Loaded

Ultimate Direction PB Vest – Fully Loaded

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Personally i cant wait to get going and will have all on to make sure i dont start too fast (as usual) but pace myself for my target time of finishing the same day we start!!! Lets see shall we.

To be able to track us at the event this weekend and see how we all go you can do so by visiting the SPORTident website.

Our numbers (or simply search on the surname) are below:

  • Andy Holohan is # 539
  • Wayne Singleton is # 744
  • Chris Chadwick is # 402
  • Glyn Rose is # 716
Click here for for the Lakeland 50 Results and we’ll see you on the other side!
Take care y’all.

Hold up, weight a minute……..

Well, who would of thought its be this close at both ends of the table after such a storming start.

We’ve all weighed in today bar Chris who’s working away in that there McScotland and their lbs are different up there so it’d be unfair for him to have a disadvantage!

Its ridiculously close and the standings look like this:

Chris 9.09%
Andy 8.65%
Glyn 2.00%
Wayne 1.86%

This actually equates to me being only 1lb behind Chris in overall weight loss and I could nip it if his carb loading for this weekends Lakeland 50 event goes well.  : )

Wayne and Glyn are virtually neck and neck so this could go either way.

The weigh in is Friday evening at the registration and kit check and network dependant we’ll be sure to share who is the biggest loser!!!

Well we’ve only a couple more weigh ins to go and who’d have thought it would have been so close at the business end of the competition and those battling for the chocolate spoon at the other!!!

Chris went off in a blaze of amazing glory at the beginning but his wonderfully talented daughter Lauren since found a fantastic new art in baking and scuppered his domination over the latter weeks of the competition. (Is it bad that the rest of us kept giving her money for ingredients!!)

So currently the % lost standings currently look like this:

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  • Chris – 9.09%
  • Andy – 8.17%
  • Glyn – 3%
  • Wayne – 2.33%

So hows it gonna finish up, find out next week when the comptition (this time round) concludes at the Lakeland 50 registration weigh in!

 

 

 

Its a bit of an odd one this week.

We’ve got a man down with a damaged ankle and three of us did arguably the biggest weekend of our training so far this year. So how is it the guy not training is the only one not to gain weight this week???

Well it may seem odd but actually it makes perfect sense. Wayne, Chris and I trashed ourselves this weekend with over 28 miles from Pooley Bridge to Ambleside on Saturday and Chris and I did another 15 miles from Ambleside to Consiton on Sunday.

The ascent was over 3,000m, nearly 10,000ft, which means lots of descending too meaning smashed quads as well as other muscles.

Up, down, over she goes!

Up, down, over she goes!

With all that activity comes DOMS, Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, and your body/muscles swells with excess fluid and blood from those muscles being worked and in some cases damaged.

Our muscles use glycogen (a water/glucose concoction in our muscles) for energy and when we work hard we deplete the glucose leaving behind just the water, which is very heavy.  Some of this water is reused in the body and some is removed via sweat or urine.

So the body needs more energy, produces more glycogen and even more water making us heavier! We also take on lots of water for hydration, likely before, certainly during and more so after the event.

Water, whilst good for you, is also very heavy. 1ltr = 1kg!!!

Now I’m sure I’ve not got this info 100% correct but it gives the general idea of why you’re generally heavier after exercise. Oh and that’s not mention all the goodies on offer at the Lakeland 50 recce checkpoints such as flap jack, jaffa cakes and Swiss bloody roll!!!!

So with all that in mind here’s how this weeks weigh in is looking:

Wahey in, June 25th

Wahey in, June 25th

Chadders still leads the way and by doing nothing Glyns closed the gap on us all!!

Stay tuned peeps, still a chance to catch him.

 

3 up 1 down keep losing……

Well this week saw much movement amongst the ultramadness crew, sadly 75% of the movement was in the wrong direction. Its not often im amongst the top 25%, certainly not in anything ultra but this week was to be the exception!

In order of largest gain this week they are:

  • Glyn
  • Chris
  • Wayne

I was able to post a larger than average loss this week closing the gap on Chadders who still remains out in front by a good 3+ %!!!

As we’ve extended the date final weigh in we still have 5 weeks to go there’s still a (outside) chance one of us could catch him and its certainly all to play for amongst the remaining  placings.

So whilst not too much movement the standings look like this:

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With a big weekend ahead of us as we’ve a Lakeland 50 Double Recce planned. This covers virtually the whole of the 50 route over two days and starts early Saturday morning at Pooley Bridge finishing in Ambleside which totals around 32 or so miles. This is followed on Sunday with the Ambleside to Coniston leg covering some 14 or so miles.

The recce misses out the required loop at Dalemain to make up the remaining  miles come event day!

With all that mileage and big ascents/descents you’d hope to see some big movements next week.

One exception will be Glyn aka ‘Mandown’ who’s foot/ankle currently looks like that of an elephants following his badly ripped tendon at the weekend.

Having been told today of no running for 4 weeks, which take us up 2 weeks prior to race day, he’ll be pushing things for the Lakeland 50! Given his athlete status, robolike physique and plenty of RICE i’m sure he’ll be back on his foot in no time!

Stay tuned for more updates from ‘mandown’ himself and to see how we go at the biggest weekend of the year for the ultramadness team!

Wwaahheeyy, he’s done it again!!!!!

Well Chris has posted yet another tremendous loss and is simply leaving us trailing in his wake!!

Chris is sitting on an amazing loss of nearly 12% since we began at the end of January.

The standings currently are:

20130604-214706.jpg

With only three weigh ins left is it all over????

Stay tuned for the latest next week and we’ve a recce on the Spine Challenger course this weekend and they usually throw up a tale or two…………

Weighing it all up…….

Well a bit of a Topsy Turvey week this week with one down, 2 up and 1 staying the same!

Chris has posted a loss making up on what he gained last week so maintains a pretty good lead into the last few weeks.

So the current standings are:

20130514-215456.jpg

Stay tuned folks, I feel a step up in training coming on to try and close the gaps…..

Weighting for the star to fall……..

…….and fall he did this week, but is it too late for us to catch him?

Chris managed to undo all his hard work with a massive gain putting him back to where he was 3 weeks ago! Did you see his BBq pic???

I’ve maintained the status quo this week but the shining stars are the Cumbria boys both posting their biggest losses of the competition so far. Well done chaps!

The results make the overall standings look like this:

photo

 

This week has shown that with the number of weigh-ins to the end of the competition reducing rapidly any significant gains could be capitalised on so be sure to subscribe by email for all the latest updates….

Well after what was one of THE worst runs out I’ve ever had on Sunday I frankly didn’t care what the results were for this week’s weigh in. (You can See Wayne’s account of the Spine recce from Gargrave – Horton-In-Ribblesdale here)

However we’ve each done our Tuesday morning weigh in and its business as usual, well almost.

Chadders continues to defy science and loses yet more!! With only 8 weigh-ins between now and the end of our competition it’s looking far less likely well catch him.

Despite my disaster on Sunday I posted another good loss proving that running club and regularly powering round Park Run and smashing PB’s is having a great effect.

Glyn, he’s also posted another steady loss this week, small but perfectly formed. Wayne had a tinsy-winsy loss this week too but sadly not enough to effect the figures!

So overall the results stand like this…..

Weigh In 30042013

It’s a pretty amazing overall loss so far from Chris and very respectable from everyone else.

Be sure to stay tuned to see how we progress as the end of the challenge nears…

 

 

 

 

Well this week we may have seen a turning point in the comp with Chris posting a zero loss/gain and the rest of the guys all posting losses!

Wayne and I posted a 2lb loss and Glyn just the one but with Chris staying the same it narrows the gap………a little.

A couple or three weeks like this one over the remaining time until the end of the challenge and that gap could shorten further.

See full results below:

iwaheyin 23042013

 

To be kept up-to date on this and other news from the ultramadness team be sure to follow the blog by subscribing at the top of the page!

Till next time, keep on running…….

Here is one of my 1st ever Ultras and write ups! Seems such a long time and many many miles ago but still quite fresh! Enjoy.

July 29th 2011 was here and I found myself pitching my tent on John Ruskins School on the back straight of the 400m running track! It had been around 10 months since I decided to enter the Lakeland 50 Ultra Marathon race and I now had less than 24hrs to wait till the preverbal hit the fan!!!

My registration was done totally on a whim, alone and having ever only run around 21 miles in just over 5hrs on some very flat terrain around my home town of Harrogate. There were lots of gets outs along the route, only ever 3 miles from my house and 3 spaniels to pull me along!!! It was fair to say I was so far out of my league it was beyond comprehension.

On top of this I registered whilst sofa bound recovering from a hernia operation which had me laid up for 2 months!

So my regime took an immediate hit, Christmas came and went with little or no training and my 1st recce and indeed 1st real run was lined up for the end of March, Ambleside to Consiton!

Id previously arranged to do this recce in February with Nick Smith and Deborah Goodall which had been arranged by Anna Barker although sadly Anna had to pull out of the recce and indeed the whole Lakeland event due to illness!

It was with great disappointment that I too was unable to attend that recce. In hindsight his was quite handy as it snowed but due to damaging my back in a mountain bike fall there was no way i could run. I actually spent the following 6 weeks receiving treatment from my Chiropractor around 3 times a week just to get me back in shape.

I think it is fair to say that at this up to this point my preparation really wasn’t going very well!

So from a pretty much standing start and on a beautiful sunny March Sunday morning we set off from the Lakes Runner and headed out of Ambleside. This was the start of my Lakeland 50 journey!

Id noticed that when I 1st arrived in Coniston for that recce and looking at all the other runners I was so the odd one out I was almost reluctant to get out of the car. However my saving grace was my trainers. Id noticed at least two other people had the same ones as me so I at least had something right. It wasn’t much but it was something and out of the car I got!

From the start in Ambleside I arrived in Coniston some 4 and half hours later in disbelief and overwhelming elation that id completed it. My motto around everything i’ve done regarding the Lakeland & other events was to enjoy and not endure.

I didn’t care how long or where i came amongst the other runners, this was about the journey and enjoying the ride! I’d certainly done that on this lovely spring morning.

So my training for the event had begun and a mental target had been set, extended, changed again and finally settled at completing the event between 15 and 20 hours! Now im not built like a runner and certainly carry more weight than your normal runner but i was full of good intentions to train hard and do what i could to prepare myself for 50 long hard miles.

I took part in the recces from Pooley Bridge to Ambleside where I met & laughed far too much with Wayne Singleton and Liz Beavis that constitutes training and Ambleside to Coniston the following day. I finished this section of the recce with Sam Blackburn and Maxine Grimshaw and covering 43 miles in 2 days this was the furthest id travelled on my feet in two days! This recce was an amazing weekend and it  was great to hook up with some good friends along the way!

Id also completed some unofficial recces of our own with great support and fun from Nick & Deborah. These included Howtown as far as Kentmere, I was actually headed toward Ambleside but after running out of water and likely daylight I decided to hitch to the pub with a couple of Brummies instead and had an amazing discussion with a woman on a bus from Staveley to Ambleside. I was to hook up with them back in Ambleside who’d made the full distance and rewarded themselves with treats in Esquires.

My running had come on leaps and bounds but I really struggled with my legs and couldn’t master the downhill’s as well as my running partners had.

We also managed a night recce of Tilberthwaite to Consiton as it was our expectation that we would be doing this section in the dark come the event. Turns out this was a total misestimation for me!! The run was great and I was pleased to keep up with my partners and enjoyed running at night.

Id also completed the Osmotherly Phoenix 17 as a recce of our own with Deborah and my dog Dibble. We managed to cover over 18+ miles which gives an indication of my navigational prowess. Again my running had improved and getting time on my feet and miles under my shoes was proving to be so valuable.

The 17 mile recce was in preparation for the Osmotherley Marathon proper in early July. My 1st ever Marathon!

It was on completion of this in just over 7hrs that I tapered down my training and prepared for the event proper! I managed a few 3-4 miles runs in the weeks running up to the main event but nothing greater.

So here i was and only a few minutes away from watching the Lakeland 100’s setting off in the glorious sunshine. I had made many friends along the way and also had my support in the form of Sarah and Rachel who had fully embraced the experience by booking into a B&B instead of camping with me!

That night i got around 3hours sleep and rose to have some breakfast and get ready for the event. My pack was sorted, around 5-6lbs or about 2.5kg

I boarded the coach after the briefings and last minute check of kit and we set off for Dalemain.  The coach journey seemed to take an age, not great after taking on a LOT of water which resulted in the biggest communal toilets against the fence when we got there.  So finally we reached the estate to see a lot of supporters to see us of and 100’s of runners itching to get started.

Sarah and Rachel had installed themselves to watch the 100 runners come through and see us all off.

It was clear at this point to Sarah that I was incredibly nervous and just wanted to get going. We were late starting by 20 mins or so but the horn blew and we were off on the lap of the estate and away down to Pooley Bridge. The feeling was amazing and i hooked up with some friends i met on the recces. Sam, a great chap, and I ran for a small distance and I passed Maxine who id covered a lot of the double recce weekend with. In fact we all finished the recce weekend together running down the Coppermines to the finish!

I covered the Dalemain estate in much quicker time than I expected to and was doing ok in the amazing weather but tremendous heat! Running down by the river provided some shelter and cooler air.

The support we all got through Pooley Bridge was fantastic, as was to be the support all the way around the event. Sarah, Rachel and new recruit Chris were by the side of the road to scream and cheer us through. This was amazing and really spurred me on, only after stealing a kiss from Sarah to send me on my way toward Howtown.

Id struggled on this section before, especially pulling up Elderbank but i reached the cairn in much better time and enjoyed the run down under the crags into Howtown checkpoint. I had some good cake and a banana and lots of juice. I refilled my water to be greeted by Deborah who asked what the hell i was doing there in front of her! Debs was of much greater pace than i and i was as shocked to be in front of her!

I left the checkpoint to tackle the highest point of the 50 and indeed the 100 route. It was a hard climb up onto Wether Hill to High Kop at over 2,000ft! I eventually scaled this, all be it at a very slow pace and across and down Brampton Common to the banks of Haweswater. I’ve never liked this section of the course as it seems to drag for an age, is tough on my feet and the run down to it always effects my legs terribly and sets the tone for the remainder of the course.

The long pull up to High Kop had taken its toll on my water supplies too and as I made my way beneath Laythwaite Crags toward Flakehow Crag I ran out!

Thankfully I knew how far it was till Mardale check point but didn’t like not having any water, especially in the heat! It was lack of water that had forced me to hitch from Kentmere on the recce in April, this wasn’t about to happen again! Regardless I cracked on as fast as i could and headed toward the Rigg and it was here i had a wobble. The lack of water and my poor food intake, virtually nothing since Howtown, was taking its toll. Before the right turn before the wood i felt very dizzy and nauseous. I was worried i was going to be sick and faint and was worried that if i did id be pulled from the race. I took a few moment to compose myself, reminded myself how far the the checkpoint was and headed for it.

I started to dream of Coca Cola and what i would eat should i arrive victorious back at Coniston before 12 noon on Sunday! This was crazy as I was way less than half way.

When i saw the check point at Mardale Head i knew I was ok, although this was still over a mile or so away. I tried hard not to look up too much at Gatesgarth Pass as i arrived and gulped down the cola and jelly beans which were gratefully received. I took some soup and propped myself on the wall for 10 minutes or so and tried to regain myself.

After the recharge I pulled up from the wall and swung my pack on, thanked the guys for their support and headed up toward the pass. This would be my 3rdtime of tackling Gatesgarth and on my 1st ascent of the 1800ft pass I must have stopped a dozen times! The 2nd time I tackled it only 2 or 3 times & on this, the most important ascent, I was to only stop once!

I made good progress up the Pass the the 1st plateau and upon seeing the 2ndclimb i laughed out loud as id forgotten about this bit! Still, I re gained my rhythm and cranked the steps out. I came across Dave from the Darwen Runner. (It was his running club that manned the CP at Tilberthwaite)

We made the summit together and carried on over the top and down towards Longsdale. Dave’s pace was good, too good for me and I let him go ahead, I was conscious of not wanting to go too fast and burning out.

As I got to the head of Longsdale and the route levelled out I got a 2nd wind and started to run toward Sadgill. To my amazement I felt as fresh as when I was running round Dalemain and was passing a great number of people who had overtaken me on the descent.

I made Sadgill in good time and excellent spirits and headed toward Kentmere.  As I made my way into Kentmere i was caught by Sam whom id last seen at Mardale Head and was a way behind me going up Gatesgarth. Sam too had a great ascent and had made great progress. It was great to see a friendly face as we were also now coming into the night section arriving at Kentmere at 9:30!

As I entered the checkpoint i was greeted by my recce partner Nick, my delight in seeing him turned to horror as I realised he should have been way ahead of me by a good number of hours. He’d had some difficulty on Gatesgarth Pass with being sick and losing a lot of fluid. He’d been well looked after at Kentemere, so much so he spent a couple of hours there! It was about to get worse as I made my way into the checkpoint for fruit smoothies pasta and biscuits I saw another familiar face in Deborah looking very glum in the corner. Again Deborah should have been hours ahead of me but had suffered in the heat and also had been diagnosed with trench foot on what was one of the hottest days of summer in the Lakes! Whilst pleased to see these two I was massively disappointed for them as there races had been shattered!

Whilst i was grabbing some pasta yet another friendly voice shouted there you are, where’ve you been all day you fu%%er! Wayne, who id met on the last recce, was running with Glyn and Liz but sadly Liz had dropped out at Howtown. Id expected to run with them, hence the greeting, but with Liz not being well id made good progress and got ahead. Wayne and Glyn had done extremely well to get to Kentemere in the time they did.

Sam and I had agreed to do the next section together and in doing so followed Nick & Deborah and Glyn and Wayne up and over Garburn and potentially head into Ambleside together as they all set off a little while ahead of us.

We’d left Kentmere with a target of hitting Ambleside at midnight.

Garburn Pass was ok and it was good to have people to talk to, Wes had now joined us and he was struggling with his feet. So much so he dropped out at the next CP. This section was OK, all our feet were hurting, a blister was forming on my right foot and the plates of my feet felt bruised. With every step and twist of my foot the pain was very evident. We negotiated the pass and Skelghyll Wood and descended into Ambleside a little after midnight. It was at this point I realised we’d set off 20mins late at Dalemain so I was in fact just inside my target time!

It was great to see Sarah, Rachel and Chris along with Deborah and Nick. It’s amazing what a huge hug and a rewarding kiss can do in the middle of the night after 36 miles! From Sarah, not Chris!

Sadly it was here that Deborah had to pull out after her gargantuan effort given her feet and issues with the heat etc. Nick on the other hand had been reborn and ran off into the night making excellent progress all the way to finish and claiming his medal! He left around 15 mins ahead of me yet finished hours in front, well done Nick, truly amazing and you SHOULD be doing the 100 next year!!!

So after a good rest at Ambleside and catching up with everyone we set off toward Coniston for the last 16 miles.

The temperature had dropped dramatically and I added a layer or two. We steadily jogged out of Ambleside, through the park, over the river and made our way to Skelwith Bridge.

It was here we took a couple of brief wrong turns towards Elterwater and onward to Chapel Stile. We made the checkpoint around 3am and were greeted with a very warm welcome, juice, soup and a rewarding cup of tea. The chimnea was also very welcomed as the temperature had swung by around 11 degrees from during the day and upon finally leaving id donned my jacket and hat to keep warm.

It wouldn’t be long now before dawn but until then it would remain cold. We made our way along Great Langdale Beck under the Lingmoor Fell and finally made it up to Blea Tarn. We’d seen a few head torches off the main route along the way.

Making our way under Hollin Crag we hugged the fern to avoid the bog, this didn’t work. Down toward Castle Howe my feet were really feeling it and starting to be quite painful. One last pull to Ruestone Quarry up to High Tilberthwaite and down to the checkpoint at Tilberthwaite I knew we were going to make it.

The short walk on the road to the checkpoint was starting to be agony and being able to sit down for ten minutes and have a brew made all the difference.

Sam and I set off to the finish some 3 miles away and began the ascent up them bloody steps to Tilberthwaite Quarry. We followed Crook Beck and made a fantastic pace up to the summit and didn’t break stride all the way, one thing on our minds to get to the top and start the descent to the finish. We completed this section in not much over the time id done on the night recce which was amazing.

We had the descent down to the Coppermines, my feet were burning now, and onto the track into the village. We upped the pace and ran down to the main street where we were met by applause from the people on the streets wh knew what we’d been through. We passed the pubs, over the bridge and toward the school.

Turning into the road to the finish I could see Deborah, Chris, Rachel and Sarah waiting for us which was amazing. We made the finish and dibbed in to stop the clock on 19hrs and 22 mins, inside the 20hrs id targeted and in 342ndposition!

We quickly went inside to be weighed, get our split times and of course our finisher’s medal!

Once wed done all this I made my way outside to Sarah and Rach. It was here the emotion of the whole event and indeed the journey id taken hit me! Trying to hold back the tears over the top of Tilberthwaite had been hard however I wasn’t so fortunate this time the emotion took over!

Sam had made his was out of the hall with his medal and we stood very proudly with the memento of our achievements.

I entered this event to be a challenge of the mind, the body and the soul. The last 50 miles, 19hrs and 22 mins had certainly been a challenge of the body; the time from me entering the event had been a challenge of the mind and soul. My journey was complete!

Had I not met the amazing people along the way, Nick and Deborah, whom id done a lot of my training and recces with and who’d also offered me so much encouragement. Sam who was the 1st person I met on the very 1st recce id taken part in and finally crossed the finish line with. Maxine whom id struggled round with on the double recce weekend and Wayne and Liz who id had such a laugh with also on that weekend this journey would have been very different.

The organisation of this event is second to none, Terry and Marc did an amazing job and of course their team from the recces to the event itself. The undertaking is massive and shouldn’t be underestimated.

Many many thanks to you all for such fun and enjoyment in what was one of the most enjoyable yet painful experiences of my life!

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Hey, weight up……………..and down!!!!

Well for this weeks eagerly anticipated weigh in it appears that lbs amongst the Ultramadness team are like corporate shares, they can go up as well as down!

After what was an awesome recce at the weekend covering the Horton-in-Ribblesdale to Hawes section (more to follow) we were all keen to see the effects at today’s weigh in. Especially after Chris’s Ultra Fueling granola experiment!

Well Chadders, hes a getting bit boring now, continues to steam ahead with an amazing 10% loss since we began the challenge and posts yet another loss this week.

I too have managed a small loss which bucks my trend having only gained once in the last 12 weeks. I’m currently posting a total loss of just under 4%

Wayne has maintained equilibrium this week and sits at an overall loss of 1.4% which has Glyn close behind, following a small gain, with an overall loss at a rounded 1%!!!!

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…….. so on we go to next week.

Stay tuned to see if we can catch Chris or if he starts to slip back a little bit.

Better still be sure to follow the blog by entering your email for all the updates as they are posted as we’ve some more recce’s, wild camps and a few races coming up.

Till next time……

After the MdS – recovery and post-race reflection

Sunday 15th April – Presentation Day

After one of the most incredible nights sleep ever, i awoke with a hunger i’d never had before.  Breakfast time.  Lots of it.  On top of more food, followed by more.  This was to become a theme for the following few days, and possibly weeks, as my body re-stocked and replenished.  I’d become incredibly lean over the course of the MdS, probably as a result of not eating enough.  Eventually we finished breakfast, and it was to be a wander down to the Hotel Cos to pick up our race t-shirts and have a wander round buying goodies from the MdS boutique.

We got to the Hotel Cos and joined the queue, which was out of the door, and looked like it was going to mean a long wait.  I don’t think it’s worth spending a load of time on the ‘queue incident’, other than to say our British patience was tested one last time by the French organisation, which i truly believe almost resulted in a riot as the boutique was closed to encourage us to go and watch the awards ceremony.

We eventually got our goodies, including the incredible, bright yellow, finishers t-shirt, which i wouldn’t take off for some time, and the grey MDS tshirt i bought, which often ends up stinking as i refuse to wear a great deal else.

I went down to the awards with Beavis and mum and we sampled the fruit juices that were on offer (incredible) and the Sultan mint tea which had been on offer throughout the week.  We spent a bit of time at the awards ceremony before getting bored and deciding to have a wander round the shops to buy some bits for the kids and ourselves.

The shopping was to be almost as much of an adventure as the race, with bartering, negotiation and being blatantly ripped off all being part of the fun. There were some real characters in the shops around the Cos, and it was a great experience to spend time in their shops, although Beavis and mum felt a bit threatened and overwhelmed a couple of times.  It came to the point that my stomach decided i needed further refuelling, so off we went to find somewhere to eat.

I could labour the story here, and it has felt like i have a bit.  But there are a few things more to tell.  Without going into loads of detail….

I nearly paid 135 Euros for three pizzas and three drinks

We went and had some beers by the pool (not allowed in the pool due to manky feet though)

I felt incredibly sad as Beavis and mum left me to go home.  It was a really weird sense of loss, and i don’t think i got to spend enough time with them in Morocco, mostly due to circumstance.  It was very weird having family there, but i’d recommend it to everyone to have someone share that experience

After they left I had another pizza

I sat for a while in the sun, then it was time for dinner, lots of it.  We also had beer, only a couple

 

Monday 16th April – Homeward Bound

The last leg of the adventure, or so i thought at the time, was the journey home.  We were up horrendously early, and hopped on the first bus, which meant front of the queue, as we’d been warned it could be a nightmare.  Turned out that our plan was a good one, as we got to lounge around the airport, while everyone else milled around stood up trying to get checked in.

I caused a bit of a worry for the guy in the cafe after i asked for a tea, rather than everyone else who was wanting coffee.  I got personal waiter service, by a guy who brought me traditional mint tea which was amazing.  As we sat waiting to board, the only entertainment was the flood of coffee that was emerging from under the counter of the cafe and spreading its way gradually across the floor of the ‘lounge’.

As i boarded, i sat down and said hi to the guy next me.  I noticed that he was wearing a Lakeland 50 t-shirt from 2011, so we had a chat about that experience as well as the MdS.  We both commented on how small the ultra-running community was.

I again made the most of the time to snooze on the way back as always, emerging from sleep only to adjust in the seat and try my best not to let my legs go numb.  As the flight went by, it was both entertaining and disturbing to see the cripples passing by on the way to the toilet.  This didn’t bode well for what was to come

We eventually got diverted to Luton, as a Virgin plane had been evacuated at Gatwick and the runway had been closed.  It turned out we weren’t the only ones to have been diverted though and the queues for immigration were quite something.  There was much banter going on as we stood waiting, and all the holiday makers were looking at us strangely, most of us wearing our finishers t-shirts.  Again, there were mini adventures at the airport, but the important story has been told now, so:

Ash and I got a taxi to Milton Keynes, which cost £60 – i just wanted to get home

I hopped on a train to Crewe, not knowing if my ticket was actually valid, but not particularly caring by then – turned out all was fine

I got to Crewe and sat around for a while, not particularly enjoying the experience. It was bloody freezing after Morocco

I got home, to what felt like a hero’s welcome.  It’s true what they say, there’s no place like home, and was good to be there.

I’m not sure i unpacked as soon as i got home, but when i did, everything stank of the stuff used to clean our feet in the desert.  Some of my kit still stinks of it now.  I wasn’t sure that some of the kit would be useable again, but most of it has survived and has been cleaned!

And i ate. A lot. And had some drinks

Tuesday 24th April and onwards – return to ‘normality’

It’s been pretty weird since returning.  Some of the people i’d spoken to who’d done the MdS before, said to prepare for feeling depressed.  I’m not sure that i’ve been depressed, but it has been different that’s for sure.

I’ve felt empty, but not in a bad way, just at peace.  It was as though all the thoughts i had, had been thought through, leaving my head empty.  It’s been a very cool experience feeling like that and has gradually faded.  I think that this might be the reason people return to the desert or feel that their souls have been cleansed.  Another phrase that i’ve heard used is that they’ve been re-set by the experience, which i think could be true also.  This all seems a bit like spiritual toss, but I’ve spoken to a few people who understand so i guess you can’t know until you’ve experienced it

I’ve felt incredibly proud of what i’ve achieved, but at the same time can’t understand some of the awe from people i’ve spoken to about what I’ve done.  I don’t feel anything other than normal and truly believe that anyone can do what i have done.  You just have to want to do it enough.  If you want to do something like this, you will

I’ve had nightmares about being back in the desert.  In the weeks following my return, i awoke a couple of times, bolt upright, with my heart pounding, screaming inside NO, I CAN’T DO ANOTHER STAGE.

Recovering has been something else.  Within a week of returning i felt that i could have run again, but i didn’t.  Indeed it took me too long to return to running properly for a number of reasons.  It did feel good to run without purpose, and without HAVING to train, and without crying with exhaustion.  This feeling hasn’t lasted though, and i have struggled with my running mojo and lacking direction

I ate like a horse for quite a while, putting on all of the weight that i lost, and too much besides.  It’s a fine balance between replenishing and becoming a chubber

I have been reminded of what we take for granted and what are the simple things in life – shower, rain, colours, a toilet.  I still love all of these things, particularly rain.  I dreamt and wished for Cumbrian rain for a full week in the desert, and i love it for that reason and many others.

I miss the silence!  The biggest thing i miss from the desert is the silence.  There was rarely any noise except wind and the talking of fellow runners.  It’s incredible how noisy our lives are every day, from things like PC’s, TV’s, phones, cars, air conditioning.  All of these things make constant noise, and it’s unusual that we ever escape from these things in our normal lives now.  I found it difficult to deal with noise on a good few occasions, and found refuge on the fells far away from traffic.  Over the summer following the MdS, i found that closing my eyes while facing the sun, particularly on a breezy day, helped me return to the desert and on a few occasions helped calm down feelings of claustrophobia.  It’s strange that it’s only as i type this that i’ve realised that what i’ve actually been doing.

A number of people have asked what next.  I don’t know.  I don’t think i need to do anything else after pushing myself through this incredible adventure, it’ll be whether i want to do anything else.

 

 

MdS kit checklist – this is the kit that i took with me, and the checklist to confirm i had it all.  Took FAR too much food!  Particularly the sweet stuff, which I ended up binning – some after day 1, the remainder on day 2

Rucksack – Aarn Marathon Magic 33l   Sunscreen  
Sleeping bag – Mountain Equipment Xero   Ibuprofen  
Sleeping mat –   Ibuprofen gel  
Walking poles – Leki   Immodium – around 3 pills per day  
Signal mirror   Paracetomol  
Whistle   Zinc Oxide tape  
Knife   Blister plasters  
Hexy blocks (ordered)   Electrolyte tablets (Nuun)  
Titanium Stove   Chapstick  
Titanium Kettle   Towel  
Spork      
Goggles      
Tyvek suit (binned before starting)      
Anti-venom pump      
Sun hat – Mammut nubian      
Water bottles x 2 – Raidlight 750ml   Toilet roll  
Skins   Toothpaste  
Shorts – Montane Terra   Toothbrush  
Base Layer – Montane Bionic   Wet wipes/wash wipes  
T-shirt – Macmillan charity shirt   Trail mix  
Injinji sock   Pen/?paper/diary  
Cushioned/compression sock – Asics      
Trainers (Inov8 Roclite 295) half size too big   Powdered Milk?  
Gaiters – Raidlight   Tea?  
Montane Oryx jacket   Sugar sachets  
Slippers      
Headtorch with fresh batteries – Alpkit   dessert x 6 – apples and custard, rice pudding with cinnamon  
Spare batteries for camera      
Matches   Dinner food x 6.  Chicken korma, pasta with chicken and vegetables, med veg pasta  
Compass   Breakfast food x 6, porridge with strawberries, porridge with sultanas  
Camera   Frusli x 14? Or flapjack  

 

 

Worth weighting for………

Well apologies to those sitting on the edge of your seats yearning for the latest results of our weekly weigh-in. What with the Easter holidays and people being away etc it meant that we weren’t able to all weigh in at the same time.

Anyway now were all back and the results are terrible!!!!

Wayne and Glyn, despite valiant training’ish efforts, have gained a lb or two. Chadders, he’s maintained the equilibrium and posted a zero loss/gain. I on the other hand after two thirsty back to back weddings and a week indulging in Cream teas etc courtesy of Devon have posted a loss!

So the standings are as below:

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Chadders is still (quality) streets ahead and hopes to maintain this thru to the finish. I’ve managed to open up a touch of daylight from Glyn and Wayne who are currently battling it out for the chocolate spoon!

Keep watching as we’ve a few recces and events lined up over the coming weeks so things could start to close up!

The final days running

No pics from during the event on this day.  I’d worn the batteries, and the replacement batteries, out on my camera.  The only ones we got were at the end (spoiler alert!)

Waking was a relief.  We only had around 6 miles to go (so we thought at first).  We had loads of chat about water and whether we needed to take a great deal as we’d only be on the move for on an hour.  We all started binning the surplus food, medical produce and general kit that we’d carried through the week but never actually needed.  I think it was at this point that Ash read his route book (bastard, why he needed to prepare like that is beyond me), and established it would be close to TEN miles that we would do in the final leg.  Big groans all around until we put it into context.  It was the final ten miles after we had completed 145 over the last six days.

After the nights incident, i’d decided that my Montane shorts weren’t go to help me complete the last stage.  The conversation went something like this – ‘Anyone got spare shorts?’, ‘why?’, ‘err, cos i crapped myself in the night’. Nice.  Surprisingly, or maybe not considering, this comment didn’t generate much response beyond Rich saying yes, and getting a pair of 70’s porn star shorts out of his bag for me try.  I put them on and minced around in them for a while before deciding that they rubbed horrendously and i could do without a load of groin chafe to celebrate my final day. Oh and i thought they looked a bit ridiculous.  Not appreciating the irony of all this, and of my comment, i said ‘cheers rich, but i think i’ll give it a miss and wear these’, at which point i dug out my Montane shorts, coated in poop, from the bin bag outside the tent.  Classy.

It was quite a cold morning, so we all dug out jackets and long sleeved shirts to protect us from the wind and another sand blasting.  Without thinking, this meant that Beavis and my mum were subsequently unable to spot me at the start that morning as they were looking for my green Macmillan t-shirt, and i was wearing bright orange. I stayed close to the right at the start as i was trying desperately to see them as i sat off but to no avail.  Turned out that i passed within a couple of feet of them.  When we got back, my mum showed me the photos she had taken at the start after they’d tried to see me, and there was one of me passing close by in my bright orange jacket.

As it was the last day, i thought i’d better put a bit of effort in and i trotted along for a while with Rich.  We passed along on fairly flat tracks for a good while, with the national park of sand dunes rising to our front and right.  Eventually, we could see ant-like figures moving up the dunes.  I felt sick.  I couldn’t believe the size of some of the climbs we were facing on the final stretch.  At this point i wasn’t sure i had enough willpower or energy left to finish.  It was to be the same as the rest of the race, one foot in front of the other, one checkpoint at a time.  We got to CP1 at 6.5km and that was it.  Turn left and we were into the dunes. Only 9k to go. Less than 6 miles.  Should be about an hour right? My arse.

We moved along the dunes following everyone in front, but i began to get frustrated as the sand had been churned up and it was two steps forward followed by one step back as we slid.  Rich started moving slowly off in front of me and i had no energy to keep up.  I didn’t want to become de-motivated or use all of my energy so i stopped and had a look round at the view.  It was stunning.  The dunes were truly incredible and we had climbed slowly but had already gained a fair bit of height to see across the desert were we’d come from the day before.  Incredible.  As i looked around i could see a few sets of footprints far over to my right so i slowly tracked across the dune ridges and picked up to follow them.  Good move, as these feet had obviously picked the hard sand line.  I felt like i was flying, and it was very rare that i ended up in soft sand or struggling up the face of a dune.

We passed by a serious of small camps that looked like semi-permanent Bedouin settlements which had incredible views.  There was nobody around at this stage other than some noisy dogs.  Slowly we carried on climbing until it felt like i had reached the top.  There was a spot where my route crossed with that of everyone else, and i met up with Owain from Wales, so we had a good chat as we trogged along (no longer running by this stage).  We shared some of our experiences of the week, along with what we were looking forward to when we got back to the hotel and when we got home, as well as our sense of relief at being nearly there.

We kept leap frogging an American named Terri who was quite annoying so i kept using my energy to try and get some distance from her.  Eventually it became apparent that she was trying to keep pace, and ignorant as this is, i decided to move over to the left on to harder sand, leaving Owain and Terri to follow their own route.

As i did this, Blue came thudding up towards us sideways on, film crew recording out of the side.  It truly was incredible to see this helicopter coming towards us up the dunes, and this was to be the last occasion i saw it in the sky (it didn’t crash or anything, i was just close to the finish)

A small time later, we saw a strange sight, which turned out to be a massive inflatable Bedouin, which marked the finish line.  I thought it was one of the usual cruel twists of this race that it would still be 2-3k away and i resigned myself to a tough half hours slog before i finally reached the finish.  I crested a sand dune and there it was!  The finish!  After 7 days in the desert!  I felt my chest heave and as i started running, i also started crying with relief.

There were a surprising amount of people around the finish cheering us all in, and as i used the very last of my energy to get me to run, i continued crying until i saw Beavis and my mum waiting at the finish. I think i gave them a bit of a wave and then i felt a bit confused by everything.  After moving for so long, i was done. I’d finished the Marathon des Sables. Wow.  I turned to look at my fellow runners, all of whom were in a similar state, and two French guys were crying and sobbing and celebrating all the same time.  I felt my chest rise again and had another blub as one of them looked at me and said ‘C’est fini’.

Patrick Bauer was there at the finish, doing what is apparently customary, giving us all a hug and handing us our medals.  I asked him to turn towards my mum who got a photo of us stood together.

It got a bit more surreal then as we were funnelled out into the town where the race had ended.  I was given a ticket to the coach that would take me back to the hotel in Ouarzazete, which wasn’t for another forty minutes or so.  I hobbled my way past and past all the kids shouting for my trainers ‘i need your shoes, i need your shoes’ was the shout repeatedly.  ‘Aye, so do i kid’ was my response.  Beavis and mum were waiting at the end, and i can’t really remember what happened at this point, other than needing the toilet.  They led me into a restaurant, where i had my first use of an ACTUAL toilet, for 7 days, which was incredible.  As i came out and went to wash, one of the Doc Trotter medics was having a wash in the sink too.  We had a quick chat, part-English, part-French and it was only as we spoke that i realised that the staff hadn’t had any washing facilities in the desert either.  We were both in awe of the amazing feeling that soap and water had to revive you.

I came out of the bathroom to see Beavis, and just felt confused, and perhaps a bit claustrophobic at the environment.  I made my apologies and said i’d see her back at the hotel and i was off to the coach.

I went and sat on the coach, which gradually started filling up.  There was a brilliant French woman who was obviously delighted to have finish the race.  In what i reckon to be her late 50’s she started singing in French ‘champions, champions’, which made me laugh, and then cry with pride.  She saw me cry and spoke in French, asking me what was wrong?  It’s all over now! We are finished!

The coach eventually filled and we finally set off.  We’d been given a packed lunch as we boarded so i slowly munched my way through bread, dried sausage, cheese, apple sauce, and a load of other bits i can’t remember now.  I drifted in and out of sleep, and a long journey didn’t take very long.  While i was awake, i got my scissors out of my medical kit and slowly cut all of the tape off my legs and feet, taking a load of hair with it.  I also started cutting the Skins off, as i couldn’t exactly strip on the bus.  As i cut them off i could feel the stink emerge, but it felt lovely to have my legs exposed after spending most of the week enclosed.

We stopped a couple of times for toileting and i remember from the very first day that Tony had recommended not getting off the bus.  This was apparently because the stench when you got back on was almost unbearable.  I stayed on, and watched as people got back on, most of them recoiling from the smell of 60 people who’d not bathed for a week.

We eventually got back to Ouarzazete and drove around the town dropping people off at the various hotels.  Different nationalities were in different areas, with the Brits in supposedly the best hotel in two.  Unfortunately annoying Terri had got on my coach, and as the staff were giving us our directions in French and telling us what would happen, she would ask in whiny voice ‘can you repeat that in English’.  EVERY time the staff spoke she would ask this, as if on this one occasion after translating everything else into English, they would only do it in French. Pissed me off a bit that she was so ignorant.

Eventually we got back to the hotel, and i shuffled my way back to our room.  Mark had already made it back and was clean and fresh looking.  He went off to the hotel and left me to my shower and shave.  Watching all the orange/brown/red sand wash down the plughole was a strange experience.  It was to be some time before the sand fully disappeared.  Eventually after getting clean and smelling nice for the first time in a good while, it was time for something to eat.

We went in to the restaurant and got a table, before approaching the buffet.  I can’t remember what i ate, but i know there was a lot of it, and a lot more, and then a lot more again.  I think i had a five-course dessert alone, which was a record even for me.  And two cold beers.  Amazing.  Then the shutters started coming down and i started to feel sick as the exhaustion kicked in, it was time for beddies.  A proper bed.  Without stones underneath. And with very little chance of a sandstorm.  I’d still have to put up with Mark’s snoring though, but that was the least of my problems.

There’s one more post to come, from after the event, but i’ll leave that until this years competitors are done…

Sobbing and running into the finish

Sobbing and running into the finish

P1010054 P1010057

The long one – Day 2

For the next however many hours, Peter and i chased the laser across the sky, with it always on our left.    I’m not going to tell any of what we discussed as it was quite personal, and was probably mostly gibberish at times anyway (particularly from me).  Suffice to say that you learn an incredible amount about a person when you’ve got nothing to do but talk and help each other through the dark places.  And believe me, in the middle of the Saharan night, you find some truly dark places.

I can’t remember what made me feel the Buff on the back of my head at 4am, but i did, and it was wet.  Why is my Buff wet?  I turned around.  Oh, it’s raining.  It’s 4am, I’m in the Sahara, on top of a massive sand dune, and it’s raining?!  Wow.  This made me glad i’d followed my mate’s advice and ‘packed a cagoule’ in the form of the jacket that Montane had sent me.  I’d worn it overnight to keep me warm and also to protect me from the wind and sand combination, and now it was keeping my dry from the rain too.   We were slowly descending from the dunes now, and every now and then i turned around to see the head torches behind us picking their way through the darkness.  After a while, we started passing people lying in their sleeping bags on the sand, obviously too exhausted to continue to the next checkpoint.  It was at this time that i realised that it was slowly starting to get light, and in the distance i could see a large shape, with a laser on it’s back.  This turned out to be a large Moroccan army truck that was carrying the laser.  As we passed by, a shape moved towards us, and i saw a young female photographer stood in her sleeping bag as protection from the wind and sand that were battering us by then.  ‘ca va?’ i said, which was met with a shrug of the shoulders and she turned to take pictures of the runners coming in behind us.  Shortly after we saw CP5 and we made our way in to pick up water before continuing.  Peter took a pic of me in the checkpoint, which shows how knackered i was looking by then.  At this point it was about 6am, and it started raining again briefly, but it had stopped by the time we departed

We left the checkpoint, and i noticed that Peter was really struggling as he was shuffling along on his feet and was obviously in agony.  I gave him my walking poles to help and he moved with confidence for a short while so I carried on.  I kept turning around to check that Peter was ok, and realised i was slowly moving away from him.  I stopped a couple of times and he caught up, but then a long period passed before i looked around, and i reckon i’d moved up to a kilometre ahead of him.  I was struggling mentally at this point, and if i’d waited i wasn’t sure how i would get going again.  I figured that he’d be ok with the help of the poles, so with regret, i turned and headed off along the track.

At some point, i looked down at my leg, and thought that the Tag Heur chip that was velcro’ed to my leg would make a cool photo, so i took a pic.  Then i wondered what i looked like, so i took a pic, then another, then another.  Then i stood having a look around for a bit.  Then i thought to myself ‘what am i doing here’  Oh yeah, MdS, best get a move on then.

Shortly after this, the Wretch32 track – Traktor popped into my head.  Well, what i think was the song anyway.  Over and over in my head ‘i go peep, peep, peep like a tractor, i go peep peep peep like a traiiiiiiiiin, a choo choo your hardcore factor’ and repeat, over and over and over. Turns out the actual lyrics are absolutely nothing like this. Strange what happens in your head after about 20 hours on the move.

I think I started to catch a couple of groups of people coming into CP6.  I didn’t want to hang around, so i got my water and off i trotted down the dried up river bed.  From this point it was only just over 10k to the finish, but boy did it seem further than that..  The ground underfoot for most of this section was horrendous, really sandy, and gritty in some places, very fine sand that seemed to fill my shoes in no time.  By this point i’d had enough of the gaiters and wasn’t bothering to fix them, or indeed to empty my shoes of sand.  All my energy was needed to keep moving.

Crossing what was to be the last section of dried up river bed, i was struggling and kept stopping to rest with my hands on my legs.  After a while a Frenchman passed me just as i’d stopped to rest again ‘don’t worry, it’s not far, take it easy now friend’ were his words.  I was really grateful and it gave me a bit of a lease of life – i could see the final ‘dunettes’ or ‘small dunes’ which were to be at 79.6k, so i trogged on.  This last bit was horrendous and i had to weave my way through the dunettes, struggling with the slippery sand that had been churned up by other runners and the Doc Trotter trucks that were roaming around ensuring we were all ok.  I emerged from the dunettes to see the finish, about a kilometre in the distance across a flat expanse.  There were a couple of British runners ahead of me that i’d passed in CP6, who’d then passed me, and i was determined to beat them.  So i started running!  I’ve no idea how, but i managed to run the last kilometre and passed them just before the finish line and that was the end of the long one.

Customary Sultan tea, grab water, wander round to the tent to the welcoming smiles of everyone else who’d already arrived – some of them many hours before me it would seem.  The wind was starting to get up and sand was starting to fly.  Moments later it was a little sandstorm (little compared to what we’d seen previously), and it was time to hunker down with buffs on again, pulling some of the tent props (sticks) down to allow less sand in.  Then the wind stopped, and it started raining – absolutely hammering it down, and the tent was soaked and dripping inside where anything touched the material.  Thankfully then the rain stopped, but the hail started.  This was unreal – hailstones that were slightly larger than peas were bouncing off the tents and the desert floor.  Then we heard the thunder start, and we were peeking out of the tent to see if we could see any lightning.  Then someone said ‘there’s still people out there’, and we realised that in all that grimness, people would still be struggling to make their way in to the finish.

After the weather calmed down, and everything had dried out a bit, we emptied the tent of our kit, piled it up outside, and dragged the floor mat outside to give it a shake.  After that, we gave all our kit a shake to remove all the sand that had blown in and reassembled the tent.  It was time for me to get some food as i hadn’t eaten for over 24 hours (except a solitary peperami for breakfast at CP5).  I had some scoff and laid down with my feet up.  I guess I slumbered for a couple of hours, but there was loads of activity as people cooked, went to send e-mails, cheered new returners to the camp so I can’t be sure.  There was a lot of noise from near the finish line, and then people started to say that the last man was about to come in.  Most of the guys from the tent went to cheer him in, but i just had no energy left and could barely move to drink, let alone return to the finish line.  From a distance, i could hear the sounds of celebration as everyone cheered and clapped the last man in.

Later on that afternoon, there was more chatter and someone said that we were receiving cans of coke!  After a week of having no treats or sugary goodness, this would be unbelievable.  I can’t remember who i begged to get mine for me, but i was still struggling for any energy and therefore struggling to move.  Whoever it was (Rich?) agreed and returned shortly after with an ice cold can of Coke, which was the most amazing tasting thing ever.  I was a bit worried about the effect of the sugar and caffeine hitting my stomach after a week without, but my sweet tooth won the day and i chugged it down, with appreciative belch to follow.

At some point, i thought i’d better make sure that Peter had got back ok, as well as retrieve my walking poles from him.  I wandered round to find him ensconsed in his tent and he welcomed me with a massive smile.  We exchanged thanks for each others support during the night, and it was good to see he’d made it ok.  He said that his feet were stuffed though and i think he mentioned that the bottoms were falling off.  His strategy for the next day was to tape them up, put his trainers on, then leave it all held together until the finish line.

The usual night-time ritual of dinner, then sleep followed.ImageImageImage

The start of ‘the long one’

Wednesday 11th April & Thursday 12th April – Stage 4, “The Long One”, 81.5km or 50.6  miles

…and the ritual started of Ash slowly clinking his way through making breakfast, then Paul doing the same, then us all getting up.  The Berbers came round and dismantled the tents again, and then a photographer turned up and said five, two, eight?  I said yes mate, that’s me.  You like taking pictures?  I said yes mate.  He then asked me to get my camera out, and put it up over my eye while he took pics of me.  I got some great pics of him taking pics of me, and his photos were to be one of the few runner profiles that were put online.  Shortly after, another guy came up and interviewed me, asking me questions about why i was doing the MdS amongst other things.  It was only when i got home that i realised how lucky i’d been to have this interview, and how delighted friends and family had been when they saw it on the website.

A couple of the lads had become mildly obsessed with a lady called Sarah from Mauritius who was in one of the French tents opposite us.  One of my tent bro’s (who shall remain nameless), had developed a particularly entertaining spanking motion to describe what he would like to do to this lady.  Alas (or possibly not), this unrequited love (i use the term loosely), was never recognised, and was often interrupted by Lydia one of the comisaires du bivouac, who unfortunately regularly disturbed the motion, amongst other unpleasant activities such as yours truly donning my Skins, on more than one occasion.

I can’t remember much of this morning, but the mood must have been a tad subdued.  We had a long distance ahead of us, wherever it’s completed.  But over two days in the Sahara, it added an extra twist!  A couple of guys had read the route book and mentioned a couple of snippets, including the legendary jebel, and the laser that would be fired across the sky during the night, but i’d tried to ignore any comments, and focus solely on the fact that it would be around 10k to the first checkpoint, and similar distances thereafter.

As usual, it seemed to be a big, long, flat, straight distance at the start of the stage, with some cracking comments in the route book “small stony hill”, “end of hill”, “becoming sandy before dunes”, and then at 6.5km, “dunes start”.  Nightmare.  The sand in the dunes was incredibly slippery and moved away with every step so it was difficult to make any headway.  I’d started walking with Dani and Mia again, plus an Australian lady who’s name i can’t remember.  We caught up with the French firemen, who were having a mare pulling the disabled kids (or one of them at least) through the dunes.  I chose to trog on and leave the ladies at this point, as i was feeling pretty good and wanted to make up some ground at an early stage, rather than just drag my feet, which at this stage is what i felt i was doing.

At 9km, we started the rocky ascent of the jebel.  I started walking more quickly as it became massive slabs of rock, and for the first time, i started passing a lot of people.  Quite a few guys in various languages (English, French, Spanish) were cursing the ascent, and struggling with how difficult it was.  I on the other hand, was absolutely loving it, it was just like a training session up Garburn, or Nan Beild, or Gatescarth, or any of the other rocky trails and passes around the Lakes that i’d done repeatedly in my training.  This is one of the few sections, that i can genuinely say i enjoyed in the whole week, and i felt like i flew up the jebel.  I got to the top, and Blue was sat on top, along with loads of photographers and people enjoying the views

I carried on walking along the edge of the ridge of the jebel, and saw a queue next to a rope, on the way down.  The view from here was incredible, runners stretched out into the distance, like tiny specks as far as the eye could see into the hazy distance.  I could see CP1 about 1km away, with a bunch of ants moving towards it across the valley bottom.  There were stacks of photographers and film crew taking pics of us all moving across the jebel ridge, and down to the top of a rope that stretched over a section of rocks.  It was busy with people stopped enjoying the view, hydrating and scoffing,  but i carried on to the queue and grabbed the rope.  After slipping down the first section, there was another two sections of rope, but these just covered a PROPER steep section of sand.  One guy at the bottom of the rope stumbled, fell and yanked the rope round which made it quite painful for everyone higher up still hanging on.  With a shout of ‘sorry guys’, he was off.  Sod it, i thought and let go of the rope and jumped!  It was amazingly liberating experience letting go of the rope and bounding down the sand.  Every time i landed, my foot sank, taking it all the way to the shin in the softer parts.  I jumped my way down, overtaking people struggling their way through the sand.  I got out of the sand section and removed my gaiters, then took off my shoes and emptied out the sand that had got in anyway.  The gaiters were rapidly becoming a bag of crap, and i was getting frustrated with them.  A Geordie voice called over “raidlight mate?  Shite eh, mine died on day two”, and i could only respond with ‘aye mate, not the best’.  Off i trotted down the rocky trail that wound it’s way gradually down to CP1.

On arrival at CP1, i funnelled into the middle of the three queue lines, which were numbered according to race numbers.  The woman in front of me turned and said something like ‘bloody French, three lines, two empty, and we have to queue’ – i was gobsmacked and this was to really annoy me for some time.  Here we were undertaking an amazing experience, and all she could do was moan about a three-person queue and a two minute wait.  I was later to find out that this was a proper annoying woman who was in a tent near us – i’ll leave it there, but she annoyed the crap out of me.  I got my water and walked to some shelter to fill my bottles, before trotting on.  As i got out of the CP, i reached up to my hat for my sunglasses, to find nothing there.  I realised i’d put them on my hat coming up the jebel, then had got hot and taken my hat off for a while, losing the shades in the process.  Gutted.  Thankfully it wasn’t too bright, but i was bothered about the rest of the race.  I picked it up a little bit, even breaking into a trot at one point, until i reached a familiar figure trudging along in the distance and realised it was Peter who i’d sat next to on the bus on the way to the desert.  I recounted the story of annoying lady and he laughed, telling me that he was the cause of the ‘queue’, as he couldn’t find his card to be stamped for water.  I also had a moan about my glasses, and he said he had a spare pair in his pack i could have.  He’d been advised by Rory Coleman to take a spare pair in case he lost them, or for some other idiot he might have the misfortune to meet who’d lost theirs!  We got on with a good chat for the next few k’s until we reached a RIVER!!  This was a pretty amazing sight, as some people had stripped off and were floating in the water, while others washed off, and others still just carried straight on.  We navigated our way across the rocks, trying not to get our feet wet.  About half way across i heard cheers and clapping and turned to find the race leaders passing us. Having set off three hours behind us, they were passing us at 18k!  Amazing.  They seemed to be skipping across the sand, and then leaping across the rocks across the river.  Some plank had stopped on a rock and blocked the passing of one of them, who had to leap into the river and then skip back out and onto the bank. Turns out this was the guy who was due to be in the lead up until the end of this stage, but more on that later.We trogged our way along the track, with more of the ‘fasty’s’ passing us, including the first of the women.  Gradually, we made our way to CP2.  I had acquired some more blister action, so asked Peter if it was ok to spend some time at the CP getting them sorted.  This was to be my first encounter with the awesome Anais, who sorted my blisters out and then sent me on my way with a ‘courage, bonne chance, until later’.  Peter had been sorting his water out and a couple of other things in the tent next to Doc Trotter.  Off we moved again, and chuntering away to each other, we passed the miles, until catching up with Mia and Dani again (or did they catch us!).  Either way, they stopped by Doc Trotter at a ruined fort that the medic said was 15th century. 

Shortly after, a Dutch girl caught up with us, not looking at all well.  She stopped and bent over, so i asked if she was ok.  She said that she’d had sickness and diarrhoea since the start of the event but she was ok and didn’t need help.  About a hundred metres down the track, she bent over and started retching and didn’t look at all well.  I could see a truck up ahead so i started walking towards it with my poles in the air making a ‘V’ as we’d been instructed.  The truck stopped some way off and a guy hopped out, and attached a fluorescent fishing light to one of the way markers.  He saw me, and hopped back in to the truck and drove towards us.  Peter had stayed with the dutch girl so i wandered back up the track with the truck following me, while i explained to the driver what was happening.  He was in the truck on his own without a Doc though which was unusual.  We stopped beside the Dutch girl and he hopped out and had a brief chat.  He asked if she wanted a doctor, but she said that she was fine, and after a couple of minutes she seemed ok again and carried on.  Peter and I shrugged at each other and followed on.

Along the way, we started seeing that all the way markers now had the fluorescent markers attached, and with a quick look at the watch, i realised it was approaching nightfall.  We made it into CP3, and got our headtorches out of our packs.  We then walked slowly out of the final checkpoint.  A couple of k outside the CP, Peter suddenly shouted ‘what the fuck is that!’, i turned and said what.  He kept pointing his finger, then his headtorch, at something moving really quickly across the floor, and eventually i caught a shape in my own headtorch.  ‘Camel spider!’ I shouted, reaching for my camera.  The next couple of minutes resulted in my trying desperately to catch a photo of this tiny, but incredibly quick, thing moving around the desert.  It was obvious that it didn’t want to be in the light of our headtorches, but i got the shot eventually.  I’m not entirely convinced that it was a camel spider, but it was a scary looking beast regardless.  Night had truly fallen by the time i had the picture and it was pitch black, except for the dozens of head torches in front and behind us.  We moved off hard packed trail and onto sand, and started climbing dunes.  We could see head torches stretching far into the distance ahead of us, and the little way markers showed us the way.  This was to be the start of a total of 2 hours climbing up the massive sand dunes.  Trying to find the best route through the dunes and over the ridges proved almost impossible and on occasion i found myself confronted with about a foot of sand over the top of my head.  This meant jamming my walking poles into the sand, and swinging a leg over the ridge while hauling myself over.  It felt more like climbing at some stages, using the poles as ice axes.  At this stage, the line of torches started to disperse over a wider area as people tried to find easier routes.

The climb flattened out a little bit and i smelt smoke.  Shortly after, we came across a group of Berber tents, and then passed some people sat on mats smoking and watching as everyone passed.  I thought that this was a bit surreal, but as we emerged from the camp, i could see one of the way markers moving around. I’d expected a bit of hallucinating after an experience in the Lakeland50 when i saw frogs, but hadn’t quite thought it would be this early.  Moments later i was reassured when Peter asked if i could see it moving.  As we got closer, we could see the marker swinging around in the air, closer still and we could see someone walking along behind it.  Then we realised that a local lad had picked up the marker, attached to some string and was swinging it around in the air.  Whilst this was entertaining, it was a bit disconcerting as we couldn’t see the next marker.  We’d been warned that this sometimes happened as locals nicked the way markers.  Thankfully we had a huge line of head torches to follow through the darkness.  We started climbing yet again, before moving along a huge ridge line and then the ground started to flatten out again.  The footing changed from sand to gravelly trail and the going became a bit easier.  Just as the footing got easier, we heard a strange crack and crackle behind us and turned to see a red flare flying up into the sky.  It was a pretty awful feeling to know that potentially someone was in enough trouble behind us to have set off their flare.  As we carried on walking, we could see lights coming toward us, then a truck pulled alongside.  The driver asked if we knew where the flare had been set off, but we could only reply by saying sorry, it was somewhere behind us.  Shortly after that, as we continued on the long walk to CP4, we saw the Dutch girl lying down beside one of the trucks, with a doctor attending to her.  I’m not sure what happened, as we didn’t see her again after this.

We seemed to round a bit of a corner on the track, and suddenly could see a huge green line in the sky.  This was our first view of the laser that was fired across the desert to guide us in from CP4 to CP5.  We knew it couldn’t be far to CP4 now, but it seemed an absolute age.  After a short while, we could see truck headlights heading down a track to our right, and then we could see the inflatable markers that signified the checkpoint ahead.  Peter agreed that we’d get our head down for a couple of hours in the checkpoint and potentially have some food.  When we arrive into CP4, we could see a number of tents, and we split up to try and find space to get our heads down.  It was quite windy by now, and it felt quite exposed so it was good to find some shelter in one of the tents.  We eventually found two spaces in one of the tents and got our kit out.  Peter started preparing some food before we got our heads down for a sleep.  One of the checkpoint staff came round and asked if we could shift our gear closer together so that another runner could sleep next to us.  Grumpy Peter responded by asking where he was supposed to sleep.  After a terse exchange, Peter moved his kit so that the other runner could get in the tent.  I unpacked my sleeping bag and got in, putting my feet up on my pack.  Peter set an alarm for 2am (it was now midnight) and we settled down.  I was right  in the side of the tent, so it sloped down almost over my face which was a bit disconcerting at first, but i was too knackered to care, and i quickly sank into sleep.

Only moments later, i was awoken with a feeling of agony in my feet.  I opened my eyes to find a guy shaking my feet, the only words i could manage were ‘aaaargh’, whilst Peter awoke and said ‘what the fuck are you doing’, an American accented voice responded saying ‘sorry, my mistake’.  I didn’t have any trouble getting back off to sleep, and it seemed only moments later that Peter was shaking my shoulder and urging me to wake up. It felt like i raised my head once to emerge from sleep, then i opened my eyes and raised it again and actually lifted my head to look around.  Peter was cooking something to eat and appeared to be mostly packed, as i got myself together and sorted stuff out.  I couldn’t eat as i felt so sick.  Thoughts whirling round my head were about quitting.  What was i doing? Why was i doing this?  I felt awful, it was 2am, i was in the Sahara, and i still had over 32k to go.

I’m quitting, I’m quitting, I’m quitting.  Get out of sleeping bag.  I’m quitting, I’m quitting, I’m quitting.  Sleeping bag into stuff sack. I’m quitting, I’m quitting, I’m quitting. Stuff sack into rucksack. I’m quitting, I’m quitting, I’m quitting. Rucksack on back. I’m quitting, I’m quitting, I’m quitting. Head torch on. I’m quitting, I’m quitting, I’m quitting. Let’s move says Peter.  And we’re off.  ‘Peter, this is as much for my benefit as for yours, but whatever happens, we don’t quit in the night, because as soon as the sun comes up the world is a less scary place’.  This was the second time i had this sort of experience and i still don’t understand it as i write this weeks after the event.  How we can consciously want to quit so much, but still everything physically moves us on towards achieving what we’ve set out to do.  I think it’s an incredible example of what human beings are capable of, and explains a lot about how people survive in life-threatening situations – not that I’m claiming my life was threatened at all during this adventure.

Next bit to come very soon!

Climbing up the jebel

Climbing up the jebel

Jumping off the jebel!

Jumping off the jebel!

The River

The River

SAMSUNG DIGIMAX A503

Weigh out in front………

Well Chris has done it again posting another loss this week to put him way out in front.

I’ve stayed static which is amazing given I had a large weekend socialising in London whereas both Glyn & Wayne both posting gains this week.

Weigh out front

Are we going to be able to catch Chadders before the end of June, be sure to follow us and the waheyin over the coming months……..

Instalment 5 – where it goes a LITTLE bit wrong…

Tuesday 10th April – Stage 3, 35 km or 21.7 miles

Same ritual, up at 5ish, try and slumber for another hour while Ash and Paul get their breakfast.  Wake up, sort breakfast.  Big difference today though, i feel that i can do this.  We’ve only got 22 miles to do today, nice easy day in advance of the long one.  I had some blistering on my feet, that i hadn’t had time to sort the evening before due to my late arrival.  I decided i’d make a visit to Doc Trotter at CP1, as it was only 12k and was pretty easy terrain to there, although the words ‘false flat ascent’ in the route book were to become apparent and a bit of an understatement.  Mark D and I said we’d walk together to start off with and did this to CP1.  I popped to Doc Trotter and got my socks off.  Medic asked me to wash my feet with a mix of water and TCP (or similar), which i did, then i showed him what i had – a blister on my right big toe and another on my left big toe.  While he was looking at my feet, he pointed out that i had blisters on both little toes too, as well as one under the ankle of my left foot.  Standard procedure for Doc Trotter with blisters mid-stage – slit blisters with razor blade, drain, inject zinc oxide after looking in your eyes and stating ‘this might burn’, then dress, then nod to runner and said ‘bonne chance’ or ‘bon courage’ or similar.  Runner says thanks, puts socks on, grimaces when putting shoes on, then off you trot.  Mark and I made our way from CP1 to the top of Zireg and saw a dune field ahead or, as the route book describes ‘succession of sandy rises and dips to Km 17’.  We descended from Zireg and down to the dune field and started crossing.  The heat rose as we made our way through the sand.  Mark turned to me and said ‘OK Wayne? I can’t f***ing hear you, as I’ve got my ipod in’, and off he went.  I whispered ‘no mate, i don’t feel well’, and tried desperately to catch up. Five minutes later, Mark turned and shouted ‘Ok Wayne?’ then turned and went on. ‘No mate’ i said to myself, and watched him slowly disappear into the distance.  I didn’t feel right.  And i remembered Rose’s face the previous day on the dried up lake.  It didn’t sink in at the time what was wrong but i knew i needed help.  In the distance was a 4×4 with the medic stood outside, watching competitors go past.  I put some effort into getting to them in order to ask for help.  I got within 100 meters or so, and the medic turned, opened the door, hopped in the truck, and they drove off.  Marvellous.  They stopped again about a half mile away, so i gritted my teeth and dug in, and trudged on.  As i was approaching, the medic turned again, to get into the vehicle, crap. ‘STOP!’, the medic turned round and walked towards me.  ‘are you ok’? she said, ‘no, i don’t feel well’ i said.  She led me round to the sheltered side of the truck and sat me down, taking hold of my arm to support me.  What’s the matter, she asked.  I just don’t feel very well was my response.  She took my water bottle from my hand (one of the 1.5 litre ones, from the last CP), and tipped some diarolyte in it.  Drink, she said as she handed it back.  So i drank a little. Quicker, she said. So i drank a little, and a little more, then retched. More, she said. More i drank, then i retched.  Here, she said, and gave me a little pill.  For the nausea, said another medic that had just arrived.  I took the pill, and drank a little, then retched. More, said medic number two, you need to drink quicker she said. So i took a good glug, then retched again.  One medic under each arm, and i was being marched/dragged towards the only tree visible in the sahara (that’s my story and i’m sticking to it).  By this time, another vehicle had arrived, and the medic (a dentist?!) was attending to the tree, moving bits out of the way, as these ones were bristly, spiky beasts that could do some injury. My two escorts asked me to lie under the tree, then one of them said ‘this will scratch and sting’. What will dammit?!  Ah, the needle in your hand, that’s now in my arm…

Then needle was in arm, bag hung in tree, tube from bag to needle, and i was having an intravenous drip.  I decided it might be a good time for a snooze…

When i opened my eyes, the angel that is Steve was stood there, with a halo (sun behind his head) ‘what the f**k’s happened Wayne’ (not sure he swore, but it adds to the story).

‘I dunno Steve, i just feel ill, can i go home?’.

‘you’ll feel better after this mate’ (exchange in French) ‘you’re having three bags of salt and two of sugar, after that you’ll feel better, you’ll probably start feeling better on bag number four, you’re on three now, when we’re done you’ll probably want to pee a lot as it’s five bags straight where it counts, and you need to think about what you want to eat, you wont want to eat at the moment, but you need to, when you’re done here, you’ll feel great, you’ll fly to the finish’, and, sleep….

‘how you feeling mate’, says Angel Steve

‘well i don’t want to home anymore, so i suppose i’m better’

‘you’re on bag number four now, one more to go’

I looked up and saw the drip hanging in the tree by a contraption cobbled together by some paracord and what looked like a carabiner.  I thought it looked pretty cool, so out came the camera, and i snapped a pic.  Steve asked if i wanted a pic of me, and then Doc Trotter picked the camera from my hand and snapped a couple.  Steve and I were laughing ‘bloody Doc Trotter, stuck needle in my arm, then nicked my camera and took pics of me to add insult to injury’

Then Pablo arrived, the crazy Italian that’s done the Marathon des Sables about 23 times and was very popular with the medics it seemed.  He was trying to get rid of an empty can of Heineken, as he’d just drunk it on top of the jebel.  He asked the medics if they had anything to drink and they began joking about having wine and cheese especially for him.  Bizarrely i think this conversation happened in French and i understood it all.  Then Pablo went and i phased out….

When i woke up, some guy was standing there saying ‘you know it’s a two-hour penalty for having a drip mate’, and Steve responded bluntly with ‘yeah but it’s better than the alternative isn’t it’.  The staff didn’t appear to like this guy much, and i was to find out why a short while later on.  I can’t say i liked him much either, but that story’s to come.

Five minutes later, and my bladder was bursting

‘i need to pee’

‘now?’ said medic

‘no, i can wait until you’re finished’ – bad idea, my bladder nearly exploded by the time the fifth bag had gone in!  Medic took needle out my arm, and strapped some cotton wool on to stop the bleeding.  ‘stand’ said medic #2.  ‘how do you feel’ said Steve.  ‘dizzy. And in dire need of a pee’ i said as i wandered off towards a bush. ‘No’, shouted the medic, ‘other way’.  Then exchange in French, which presumably indicated i was going to urinate, which i promptly did, for about fifteen minutes.  Then i wandered back towards towards the vehicles.  ‘off you go, 18k’, said medic – and pointed down the track. So off i went…

I felt INCREDIBLE, and was rocking along the track.  I caught up with two guys that i found out were called Aaron and Dave and said hi.  I walked alongside them for a while and realised that Aaron was the guy that had helpfully reminded me about the time penalty for the drip.  They were both discussing how, with 18k to go, we couldn’t finish before the cut-off.  I felt really disheartened and disappointed, i couldn’t believe that i would be pulled for being so slow, particularly after having just spent 1.5 hours under a tree with a drip.  But shit happens, nothing i could do about it except trudge on to the next CP.  Then a 4×4 drove up fast behind and slowed down alongside.  The window came down and a head popped out ‘4k guys, we got it wrong, it’s only 4k until the next CP’.  That meant 4k to the next CP, and another 10k to the finish.  I did some quick maths, which is never my strong point, and i figured i could make it, and live to fight another day.  AWESOME!  Aaron said that it didn’t matter, he was going slowly and would wait around at the next checkpoint so they would be pulled/disqualified from the race.  I decided that i couldn’t be bothered with their losing, negative attitude and i got my head down and walked a load quicker, gradually pulling away from them.  I decided that i would put everything into finishing as fast as i could, bearing in mind that the terrain and pack weight mixed with the continued heat, meant that i was doing some fast walking.  I couldn’t bear the thought of being pulled from the race having not put all of my energy and motivation into finishing.  So off i went, with Steve’s words ringing in my ears ‘you’ll fly to the finish’…

Trotting along down the track, then up a mini-jebel, then launching myself off down the sand, i spotted the next CP in the distance.  Then i heard cheering and shouts of ‘Courage’, and ‘Bonne chance’ from above, and looked to see a bunch of staff from the CP cheering me on.  Having a little blub, and feeling incredibly proud, i trotted on to the CP and grabbed my water.  It was across another dried up lake bed then, which was difficult due to the sand being blown across.  Part-way across was Blue, and the pilot was shouting and gesturing ‘gauche, gauche’, so i looked up to see the route markers some way to my left.  I whistled to Pablo, who was around 200m ahead of me.  When he turned his head, i gestured, and he waved to acknowledge me, before moving across to pick up the route.  Shortly after, i passed Pablo and he muttered his thanks.  Next to reel in, were the two guys ahead in pink gaiters – hereafter known as the Pink Gaiter Brigade, who i passed just before the end of the lake.  Then we were onto a ‘road’, and i use the term lightly, which led to an incredible oasis, and an auberge, where the darbaroud staff appeared to be congregating for beers and ice cream (or so i dreamed).

I knew that it wasn’t far to go now, only probably a matter of about three miles, and at least there was plenty of scenery to keep me occupied as i trogged along.  I passed a dilapidated building, with a teddy sat on a ruined wall, and a load of abandoned clothes on the wall.  I wondered what had happened to the people who had once lived there, and stopped to take a couple of pictures before carrying on.  Then i heard a noise behind me and turned to see a three or four year old girl stood in the doorway of the ‘house’.  This was one of the many times that i was struck by the poverty (or apparent poverty) that existed in Morocco, and many of us talked about how people managed to survive or scrape a living in the landscape we were running through.

I carried on along the track and saw the camp in the distance through a sand haze and wondered whether we would be experiencing a sand storm later.  I made it to the end, to rapturous applause (or maybe that’s part of my exaggeration again), and went through the usual processing.  Grabbed my cardboard cup of Sultan tea, have a bit of a drink, wander to the truck for my issue of 4.5 litres water, but this time, i asked them to put two bottles into my rucksack for me – such a genius!.  This left me to carry my tea, and another bottle of water back to the tent.  Wandering back, i got a bit overwhelmed again by everyone congratulating me for being such a slow coach, and felt so proud about what i’d achieved despite a rough day.

Back at the tent, and everyone said they’d be concerned again, which was worsened by the story i then told.  I was really unfair about telling everyone that Mark deserted me, and i hope that he’s seen the jest in what has now become my standard story of events!  I think that this was also the day that Mark R had ended up collapsing at the finish line and ended up in the doc trotter tent for a bit.  The start of the “have you ever had a drip, under a tree, in the sahara? No? Then don’t talk to me about hardcore!” story commenced.

Feed time and i had an awesome chicken korma with rice, followed by rice pudding with cinnamon, and a peperami (not together).  Rich started what was to become a long running joke, by complaining that he had spag bol again, and he hated spag bol.  It seemed that he’d not packed much other than spag bol though!

After scoff, we were having a bit of banter and i started to get worried again about the event, and the next day that was looming.  I got a bit overwhelmed by the distance again, and after i’d fucked up so royally by getting dehydrated, everything was bothering me about drinking enough water, and taking enough salt tablets.

As expected when i’d been coming into the finish, the wind started increasing, and the air started filling with sand.  We tucked into our sleeping bags and tried to cover our exposed skin, which included buffs up over our faces.  I tried to take a few pics of the guys in the tent lying there with eyes closed while we got whipped with the sand.  As i was taking the pics, i could see that we were slowly getting covered with a layer of sand, and i could taste it in my mouth,  We hadn’t quite figured out how to pull the tent front and back down by this stage, so the wind was still blasting through

(In the pic shown with us all tucked up, it’s still daytime, and the flecks in the air are sand, as we were slowly coated)

After a while the wind calmed down, and the sand slowly sank, covering us even more, and the taste of sand and dryness in the mouth was incredible.  I needed to drink if only to wash out some of the sand, but it was SO cold it was unreal.  I could see my breath and reckon it was probably down to about 2 degrees C.  During the night i woke up many times feeling really really cold and shivering almost uncontrollably.  The buff now came in useful to try and keep me warm, rather than just protect me from the sand.  Wriggling down into the sleeping bag, i slept fitfully until the sun came up….

As I write this, I am referring to all the stages of the route book as I go along.  As i opened this stage, a small, perfectly pressed and incredibly dead fly fell out of the pages! ImageImageImage

Marathon des Sables – Instalment 4 – Stage 2

strapping the 'injury'

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'I can't do this'

‘I can’t do this’

strapping the 'injury'Quick word of thanks before the blog entry. Devinder Bains has corrected my dates (unsure how i messed up on it!), so they don’t follow on from the last blog entry – cheers Dee!

Monday 9th April – Stage 2, 38.5km or 24 miles
Same routine as previous day, but with added complications. Running through my head all night was doubt. I can’t do this. It’s too far. It’s too hot. The rucksack is too heavy. I feel sick. Is my leg sore? Ash awoke around 5:10 and started making his breakfast. Paul did the same shortly after. Tony was still asleep in the corner, expecting to go. I committed to myself that if he left, I was going with him. I got up, got my breakfast on, and started packing my kit into my bag, sorting feet and shoes out, got water from the centre of the camp, filled water bottles, all the time with the thought running round my head ‘I’m going to quit, I’m going to quit’. Bit of light relief when Mark R decided to ‘enjoy’ the Bodyglide experience and I was well amused by him for long enough to get a great picture which is unpublishable!
Mark D took a picture of me that morning that demonstrates perfectly the way I was feeling. It looks like I’m having an argument with my rucksack. I’ve posted it onto facebook with the following words ‘What misery looks like – morning of Day 2, i want to go home, i can’t do this, it’s too hot, my bag’s too heavy, why am I doing this, I’ve got another SIX days of this, what am I doing, repeat (close to tears). Stand up, grit teeth, rucksack on, get to start, only 22 miles today. At least I don’t have cancer….’. It’s probably not far from what happened with the conversation going over and over in my head, all the time I was preparing myself and making my way to the start line. After the event, the guys in the tent were to say to me that they had no idea how I did this, how I got up on Day 2, let alone start, let alone finish the day. I think it’s testament to what people are actually capable of, albeit in a small way I think I’ve demonstrated what we can each achieve. Liz and Mum were due to fly out on Thursday to see me, and I was rehearsing the phone call I would make to them from the hotel. All the while, I was stood on the start line, half listening to The Pope talking about standings after day 1, the route ahead, cut off times, those who had birthdays that day… and then Highway to Hell started, and I moved my feet, and I crossed the start line for Stage 2. Only 12.3km until CP1…. One foot in front of the other….
I don’t remember much of that morning between the start and CP2, apart from the next paragraph, but i think i was alone for much of it. I think even if i was accompanied, i would have been alone with selfish thoughts of quitting, all the while plodding away. Anyway, i got to CP1, then only another 7km to CP2. Easy.
Part way to CP2, the front of my leg started hurting. Last year in the Lakeland 50, I’d tied my shoe laces too tight and had done some damage to tendons/ligaments. My not-so-little sister Kerry had given me treatment and told me what it was (didn’t pay much attention sorry Kez) at the time, but this felt like the same thing again. It got progressively worse and was all i could focus on which was bad news. There was a 4×4 going past when i pulled up – and an English voice (i think it was Steve, soon to become my guardian angel) asked if i was ok. Not really, was my response, and the medic hopped out. I explained my story, Steve translated, and the medic pulled my Skins up to look at my leg while saying something like “je veux strapper?” – “shall i strap it?”. Translation happened with me saying yes, and her getting some tape out. The tape wouldn’t stick to my extremely sweaty leg, so medic said to get it done at CP2. She then gave me a pill the size of a baby’s head, stamped my medical card and then looked at me. I looked back at her. Steve said, ‘go on then’. And i stood up. And moved on. To this day, i’m not sure there was anything wrong with my leg, but think i was looking for an excuse to give up. Except Doc Trotter and the Commissaires don’t allow you the luxury (escape/easy way out?) of an excuse, unless you’re really in trouble. I trogged on to CP2 and went to the Doc Trotter tent. I rolled my Skins up, and got strapped up, ready to go.

A voice shouted ‘Hi Wayne, fancy joining us’ and i looked up to see Mia there, along with Rose. I nodded my acknowledgement and we made ready to move after sorting water, electrolyte, and taking salt. It was just short of 10km from CP2 to CP3. Across a dried up lake bed. With no cover. And plenty of wind and heat. We were later to discover that the temperature in the camp/bivouac had got up to 52 centigrade. Just about the time i was moving across the lake bed then!
Mia, Rose, and I moved out of CP2 and started the long, straight trek across to CP3. I felt like a desert version of Shackleton – goggles on, buff over face to cover from sand blasting, Foreign Legion-style hat to cover head and neck. The world was seen through the frame of darkened goggles and i was plodding along with the weight of the world on my shoulders…. except i wasn’t… i was ENJOYING IT! I suddenly realised how amazing this was – i’d trained hard to be here. I’d cried from exhaustion, exhilaration and frustration during training. I’d been through incredibly poor weather including gales, hail, pounding rain and snow in the depth of the Great British winter. I could do this. Ashley’s words came back to me ‘stick with it, it’ll click, you’ll start enjoying it’ and I realised he’d been right. I didn’t want to quit, this was an amazing experience, i was doing it for an amazing cause. And I felt proud of myself. Only 10k to the next CP, only 6 miles. Around two hours walking. Easy.
About halfway across the lake, Mia stopped to sort something, and we carried on walking slowly. Rose and I chatted away a little, but conversation was challenging due to the wind, sandblasting, and the buffs we had across our faces as protection. Then Rose pulled up dead and said ‘i feel sick’. She tried to move, and managed a few steps, before stopping again and looking around in a daze. 4×4 appeared in the distance and drove up, the driver shouting ‘ca va?’ out of the window. ‘Yes’ shouted Rose. ‘NO’ shouted yours truly. Medic hopped out and said ‘what’s the matter’. I explained about Rose, and the medic asked her to sit down – in the direct sunlight and sand-blasting, so i suggested we move round the other side of the truck where there was protection from the sun and wind. The medic took Rose’s water bottle off her and tipped in some rehydration salts, handed it back to her and said ‘drink’. Rose drank, and retched, then drank, then retched, then the medic gave her a pill for the nausea, then Rose drank, and drank…. Then Mia walked by and shouted over ‘i can’t leave you for a minute can I’ and came over to see what was occurring. I filled Mia in on the situation, while Rose carried on drinking and slowly started feeling better. Meanwhile, i ligged out on the sand with a couple of the other medics that had turned up, one of which Mia was particularly pleased with as he looked George Clooney-esque. He was an interesting bloke and i think was a heart specialist (and I found out later he was the Medical Director for the event). He said that Doc Trotter was an amazing organisation, and we were very lucky as they had better equipment than the hospitals of many small towns (cardiologists, surgeons, even a dentist). After a full 1.5 litres (i think) of water, Rose felt better and we got up and plodded on. This experience watching Rose was to come in handy for me the next day. The medics kept driving past us, then pulling up by the route markers and waiting for us to pass. After a short while, i realised that they were pulling up the markers as we passed, and the realisation that we were the back markers sunk in.
I think we were silent again for a long while due to the wind, and i became introspective, but for the first time this was positive. I came to enjoy the time to think, and remembered the Depeche Mode song “Enjoy the Silence” and tried desperately for a while to remember the words, before my brain skipped to the theme from ‘the littlest hobo’, then skipped to ‘Star spangled banner’ before being reminded of Winston Churchill’s words ‘if you’re going through hell, keep going’. All of this entertained me greatly, and i was pleased to be enjoying my experience. This was one of the first times through the MdS experience that i realised that my head was starting to empty, and i came to appreciate the beauty and simplicity of what we were doing. Wake up, eat, run (walk!), finish, eat, remember to drink throughout….
Towards the edge of the lake, we began to see large animals in the distance and realised that they were herds of camels – HUNDREDS of camels. I’d never expected to see so many, and didn’t realise that camels came in loads of different colours, most of the ones we saw were a dark brown. Then we saw herds of goats too and i was snapping away at all the wildlife, enjoying the experience even more as the camels were amusing me greatly. Mia and Rose gave me some strange looks as i chuckled at one of the camels in particular that had crossed the trail in front of me.

We reached CP3 and it was only 9.2km to go, along with 1.7km of ‘dunettes’ ahead. It was here that i realised the French were particularly inventive with their descriptions of the sand we went through. These were ‘small dunes’, up to the height of around the first storey of a building, but we managed to weave our way through them, being drained by the terrain with every step. After the dunes was ‘sand bumps’, ‘sandy terrain’ then 0.7km, followed by ‘small line of dunes for 200m’ after which was the finish. We made our way slowly through this and could see the start in the distance. We could see a lot of people at the finish gesticulating, then some began running towards us jabbing their arms in the air. Then i heard ‘FOUR MINUTES, YOU’VE GOT FOUR MINUTES TO CUT OFF’, and realised they were showing us four fingers. Shit, we started running, using the last of our reserves, and managed to get over the line without being disqualified. I’m still not sure that we had only four minutes, as the sweeper camels weren’t anywhere in sight. The camels were the cut off, if they caught up with you, then you could get disqualified (they were led by Berber’s, they weren’t just wandering the desert). Crossing the line, i grabbed a cup of the almost-mandatory Sultan tea – and i loved it – minty, hot, sweet and maybe a little salty, it revived me and i realised i’d loved the day. Hobbling past the finish area, i went to get my nightly issue of 4.5 litres of water, and wondered if i had enough energy to carry it to the tent. On the way to our tent, i passed many other runners eating their tea, and experienced many moments of pride as they were clapping, shouting ‘Well done mate’, or ‘Bravo’, ‘magnifique’, ‘courage’ (from the French tents on my right). I realised that they were respecting me for being out so long, and i felt honoured that all these people who were so much faster than i was, realised how difficult it can be at the back of the pack. Another example of the amazing support between competitors in this event.

Back at the tent, my colleagues were sorting themselves out, and i dumped my bag, and we relived the days events. Again, i was enjoying the experience. I got emotional as i said thanks to all, but Ash in particular for his words the previous day. Tony was still in the tent, as he’d not managed to get transport back to Ouarzazete. It was good to see him, even if i couldn’t understand a great deal of what he said due to his strong Midlands accent. We received e-mails at some point, and i’d got more tonight than last night. I also decided that my pack was too heavy and decided to either bin or give away a load of Frusli bars and some flapjack. One of the most memorable comments was from Dean who asked me what i would do for food during the day. It wasn’t until Friday that this sunk in, and part of the reason for my slowness at the end of each stage started sinking in. That said this was the night for me that the banter really started in the tent, and i remember having a good crack and enjoying what remained of the evening before the sun sank dramatically at around 7pm, and we climbed into our sleeping bags

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